Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya competed for Australia at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics alongside skating partner Harley Windsor.

By Ally Mauch
July 18, 2020
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Joosep Martinson - International Skating Union/International Skating Union via Getty Images
| Credit: Joosep Martinson - International Skating Union/International Skating Union via Getty Images

Olympic figure skater Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya has died at the age of 20, the International Skating Union confirmed on Friday.

The Russian athlete died in Moscow, though additional details of her death were not immediately known, according to the Associated Press.

"The ISU is shocked by the news of Ekaterina's passing," President Jan Dijkema said in a statement on ISU's website. "She was a talented pair skater and the Figure Skating community will miss her. We offer our deepest sympathies to her family, friends and teammates and mourn this tragic loss."

Alexandrovskaya was born in Russia and gained her Australian citizenship in 2016. She competed for Australia alongside skating partner Harley Windsor at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics and placed 18th. The pair won the world junior title the year before.

Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya and Harley Windsor
| Credit: Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Alexandrovskaya retired from the sport in February due to injuries. She and Windsor also announced the end of their partnership.

“Words can not describe how I feel right now, I am devastated and sick to my core about the sad and sudden passing of Katia,” Windsor wrote on Instagram following the news of her death, alongside a photo of the skating partners.

“The amount we had achieved during our partnership is something I can never forget and will always hold close to my heart,” he added. “This news is something you can never prepare for. Rest In Peace Katia.”

Ian Chesterman, the chef de mission for the Australian team at the Winter Games in Pyeongchang, told the AP that Alexandrovskaya was "incredibly determined."

“It is enormously sad to lose Katia, who was a vibrant and talented person and an incredible athlete,” Chesterman said. “She was quiet and humble in her manner but incredibly determined to be the best she could be. Life since the Games has not been easy for her and this is another timely reminder of just how fragile life is.”

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