The 33-year-old actress also called the Delta variant a "little b—h" in a recent Instagram Story.

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Hilary Duff is battling a breakthrough COVID-19 infection.

The 33-year-old actress recently revealed her diagnosis in an Instagram Story, writing, "That delta...she's a little b—h."

Duff, who is "happy to be vaxxed" against COVID-19, said her symptoms included a "bad headache," as well as sinus pressure, brain fog, and loss of taste and smell. The news comes just days after Duff was set to begin filming How I Met Your Father, a sequel series to the TV sitcom, How I Met Your Mother.

Though rare, breakthrough COVID-19 infections can occur when someone who is fully vaccinated (and has been for at least two weeks) contracts the virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fully vaccinated folks who do endure a breakthrough infection are less likely to develop serious illness, however, compared to those who are not vaccinated against COVID-19, according to the CDC.

Why the sudden rise in breakthrough COVID-19 infections? Well, the highly contagious Delta variant continues to pose a problem, as the strain counts for 86 percent of new cases, according to recent CDC data. Though research about the Delta variant is ongoing, it seems that those infected with this particular strain carry large viral loads (or the amount of virus in their blood), which means they can shred and spread the virus more rapidly.

In addition to being extremely contagious, the Delta variant also has more severe symptoms than other strains. Doctors have seen an increased likelihood of hearing loss, abdominal pain, and nausea in infected patients. Bhakti, Hansoti, M.D., an associate professor of emergency medicine and international health at John Hopkins University and Bloomberg School of Public Health, also told USA Today in June that patients infected with the Delta variant are more likely to require hospitalization and oxygen treatments.

The COVID-19 vaccine remains the best bet in protecting oneself and others from infection. And, on Monday, the Food and Drug Administration granted full approval of the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, the first coronavirus vaccine to get a green light of that magnitude by the organization.

As for Duff, she isn't the only star who has combated a breakthrough COVID-19 case. Catt Sadler, Reba McEntire, and Melissa Joan Hart are among those who have reported breakthrough infections despite being fully vaccinated against the virus. In an Instagram video shared Wednesday, Hart said she believes her children were exposed to the virus at school, where masks aren't required. Due to the rapid proliferation of the Delta variant, the CDC now recommends universal indoor masking regardless of vaccination status.

"I am vaccinated and I got COVID, and it's bad," lamented Hart on Instagram. "It's weighing on my chest. It's hard to breathe. One of my kids, I think, has it so far. I'm praying that the other ones are okay. I think as a country we got a little lazy and I'm really mad that my kids didn't have to wear a mask at school. I'm pretty sure where this came from."

She continued Thursday on Instagram, "I'm just scared and sad, and disappointed in myself and some of our leaders. I just wish I'd done better, so I'm asking you guys to do better. Protect your families. Protect your kids."

Hart offered a positive update Sunday on her Instagram page, telling her followers she's doing "so much better." "It's been a rough week, but feeling better," said Hart in the clip. "Stay safe, everybody."

The information in this story is accurate as of press time. However, as the situation surrounding COVID-19 continues to evolve, it's possible that some data have changed since publication. While Health is trying to keep our stories as up-to-date as possible, we also encourage readers to stay informed on news and recommendations for their own communities by using the CDCWHO, and their local public health department as resources.

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This story originally appeared on shape.com