Their obliviousness is just pure entertainment.

By Health.com
May 01, 2018

When asked about women’s health topics, we recently discovered that the general male population seriously struggles. And that's on us, to be honest. We’ve been recruiting a panel of men to our video studio for some laughs, but also to educate them in everything from tampons to boobs to a woman’s menstrual cycle (face palms, all around). Here, we asked our sex-ed guys to explain the term Braxton Hicks. And. It. Is. Too. Much.

WATCH THE VIDEO: What Happened When We Asked 7 Dudes to Explain the Placenta

When asked to define Braxton Hicks, there were a lot of “ums” and deer-in-headlight looks before our guys came up with responses that were, well, original. Water birth? Nope. Country Band? LOL. A sports play? Not even close (sorry guys). Although our panel of dudes were more than a little in the dark, we wouldn’t be surprised if some women are also hearing this funny phrase for the first time and thinking wtf?

WATCH THE VIDEO: 7 Men Tell Us What They Know About Ob-Gyns, Pap Smears, and the G-Spot

Coined in 1872 by none other than English doctor John Braxton Hicks, the term describes the contractions that occur before real labor (ding!). The muscles of the uterus tighten for 30 seconds to a minute, and sometimes as long as two minutes, tricking you into thinking that the baby is on its way. These “fake” contractions can happen as early as the second trimester, but are most common during the third trimester, according to the American Pregnancy Association. If we had to find the silver lining, we’d say that Braxton Hicks contractions are a great opportunity to practice breathing exercises and techniques taught in childbirth classes, in order to prepare for the main event. Triggered by dehydration, an active mother or baby, a full bladder, or even sex, these “practice contractions” can intensify closer to the delivery date and make you feel like you’re actually going into labor!

The female body is an amazing thing, and now our guys are a bit more clued in when it comes to what women experience during pregnancy. Maybe instead of getting a deer-in-headlights look when their partner is having Braxton Hicks contractions in the future, they’ll reach for her hand and say, “you got this! Just breathe through it, baby.”