The truth about postpartum sexy time.

By Samantha Lauriello
September 26, 2018

If you've recently had a baby—or you plan to be pregnant in the future—it’s totally understandable to worry about what having a kid will do to your sex life. Your vagina just popped out a human, which can change things down below. Plus, all those sleepless nights with a screaming newborn might tank your sex drive.

Well, here’s the good news: Some women say having sex after giving birth is actually better than it was before, according to a recent survey.

Peanut, a social networking app for moms, questioned 1,000 women ages 27 to 37 about their sex lives both pre- and postpartum. The results show that the physical and emotional toll of growing a baby doesn’t put a damper on the action between the sheets.

RELATED: 17 Things No One Tells You About Recovering From Childbirth

About 74% of the mamas surveyed said the quality of sex after having a baby was the same or even better than before. And completely contrary to all the stereotypes, 61% reported higher levels of sexual desire than ever.

Being nervous about getting back in the saddle was also pretty common: 62% of new moms said they were worried about what it would be like. Out of that group, 72% reported that they were afraid of pain, and 24% said self-consciousness played a role.

The survey showed that millennial moms are eager to get back in the game: 52% said they got down to business as soon as the doc gave them the go ahead. And 45% of women with a baby under one year old said they had sex with their kiddo in the room. They’re too young to know, right?

RELATED: 5 Things That Happen to Your Vagina After You Give Birth

Doctors typically recommend waiting four to six weeks before getting it on postpartum. This gives your body time to heal and lowers your risk of infection, especially if vaginal tissue was torn during delivery.

But despite these encouraging statistics, don't fret if your sex drive takes its time coming back. “Changes in estrogen levels and breastfeeding can cause a slower return of libido,” Hector O. Chapa, MD, clinical assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Texas A&M College of Medicine in College Station, previously told Health.