Anal Orgasms Are Real — Here's How to Have One

There are lots of different kinds of orgasms, but is an anal orgasm actually possible? In fact, it is, and anyone with a butt can experience it. 

An anal orgasm results from sexual stimulation of the nerves in and around the anus. The anus is packed with nerves, especially the pudendal nerve, a major nerve in the pelvic area 

If you have a vagina, the pudendal nerve also carries sensation to your vagina, labia, and clitoris. And if you have a penis, this nerve carries sensations to the penis and scrotum. It also helps control muscles for erection and ejaculation. So stimulating this nerve during anal sex can help stimulate nearby erogenous zones to help you reach the Big O. 

If you have a vagina, anal sex may also help you orgasm via the G-spot and A-spot; if you have a penis, it’ll be the P-spot (or prostate).

Couple in bed

Irina Polonina / Stocksy

A-Spot Anal Orgasms

The A-spot, or anterior fornix erogenous zone, is located deep inside the front wall of the vagina, between the cervix and the bladder. Due to the proximity of the anus to the vaginal wall, you can indirectly pleasure the A-spot through anal penetration, which can result in a powerful orgasm.  

G-Spot Anal Orgasms

The G-spot is also located on the vagina's anterior wall, about halfway between the vaginal opening and the cervix. Though the G-spot is not necessarily a distinct part of your anatomy, it's generally considered part of the clitoris' network of nerve endings.

The right angle during anal sex can stimulate this spot as the anterior vaginal wall is pushed. Glands in the G-spot area may also be responsible for female ejaculation or "squirting" during sex.

Prostate Anal Orgasms

If you have a penis, the prostate (or P-spot) gland is a walnut-sized gland that sits under your bladder, and is responsible for ejaculation and creating semen. It's also extremely sensitive, and many people with a penis find that putting direct or indirect pressure on it during sex creates a pleasurable sensation that can lead to more powerful and intense orgasms. This is usually how people with a penis reach orgasm during anal sex.

What Does An Anal Orgasm Feel Like?

Some people with vaginas claim an anal orgasm feels similar to a clitoral orgasm (i.e., a pulse of pleasurable contractions), but this time around the anal sphincter, Andrea Barrica, founder of the sexual education website O.school, told Health

Other people may feel more of a "spreading wave" of pleasure. Bottom line: if you climax via anal sex, it will feel pleasurable like any other orgasm.

How To Have an Anal Orgasm

Some people may have an orgasm during penetrative anal sex with their partner's penis. Others get there via lighter touching or using toys. Like any other kind of orgasm, there's no "right" way to do it. Everyone has their own technique depending on what feels good for their body and comfort level.

Here's how to get started and have an anal orgasm.

Get Comfortable and Relax

If you're the receiver, make sure you've prepared for anal sex and have cleaned your anus area. Talk to your partner about how you'll communicate if one of you wants to stop or is uncomfortable. Then set the tone for relaxation, maybe with some mood lighting or music. Make the environment comfortable and stress-free. 

Start With Foreplay

Like with any sexual act, foreplay such as touching, kissing, and vaginal, penis, or clitoral stimulation can help you ease into it. "Take it slow, use your hands, help your partner relax, and make sure you're both comfortable," Alicia Sinclair, certified sex educator and CEO of b-Vibe, told Health.

Use Lube

Anal sex without lubrication can be painful and lead to anal tearing, which isn't going to help you climax. Using lube helps lubricate the area and makes the whole experience feel better. You can add lube to the anus and penis or sex toy, whatever you prefer that feels good.

Just make sure you use the right lube. Water-based lubes are typically fine for any kind of anal play, but oil-based lube can break down latex condoms and silicone sex toys. Silicone-based lube is a popular pick for anal sex and is safe with condoms, but it will destroy silicone toys.

Ease into Anal Play

Once you're relaxed and ready, begin with a tongue or finger to gently stimulate the area of the anus. "When you're aroused, try to ease one finger or tip of a plug inside," Megwyn White, director of education at online sex toy retailer Satisfyer, told Health. The muscles will open up naturally so the plug or finger can go inside. If you have to force it, you're probably not ready.

Try Different Penetration Techniques

You can try something bigger from there — like a plug, strap-on dildo, or penis. "If the plug or finger easily slide in and out of the anus without discomfort, you may want to move into penetrative sex," said White. If you opt for a toy, Sinclair suggests one that's slightly longer than your finger, no wider than two fingers, non-textured, and made of a flexible material.

That said, the way to get started is to experiment. "Pleasurable anal play can happen with an anal vibrator, plug or beads, a penis or dildo, finger play, analingus, really anything," said Sinclair. 

Keep Relaxing to Climax

As you get more into it, your anal area may start feeling pleasurable sensations, even a buildup of pressure that segues into contraction-like waves. If what you experience isn't quite the release you usually feel when you orgasm, it should still feel good.

If you're experiencing pleasurable sensations, but you're not quite reaching climax, take a deep breath — and take the idea of having an orgasm off the table. "Pressure, stress, and anxiety are the biggest blockers of orgasm," said Barrica. Try staying in the moment when you explore the sensations of anal play.

How to Practice Safer Anal Sex

Like any sex, anal sex can involve some risks and potential discomforts. Here's how to reduce your risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and injury, which will make an anal climax even more enjoyable: 

  • Clean your anus: Washing up helps avoid lingering poop. 
  • Use a lubricant: Lubrication makes anal sex more comfortable and helps prevent tearing. 
  • Use condoms: Covering toys and penises with a condom can reduce your risk of STIs.
  • Choose sex toys with a flared base: Toys without a flared base can get lost in your butt.
  • Wash before vaginal play: Cleaning the penis or sex toy, and swapping condoms, can help avoid bacterial infections. 
  • Clean your sex toys: Toys can spread STIs through lingering body fluids.  
  • Stop if anal sex hurts: Anal sex should be enjoyable for you or your partner.

Using the right lube is also essential. As a reminder, make sure you don't use oil-based lubes with condoms or silicone sex toys. And don't use silicone-based lubes with silicone toys. 

A Quick Review

Anyone can experience anal orgasm. Whether you prefer being penetrated with a toy or a penis, finding the right pleasure spots can help you climax. For some people, stimulating the sensitive nerves in the anus is enough to orgasm. Others may orgasm via the A-spot, G-spot, or P-spot (prostate). It may take some experimenting to figure out what helps you orgasm. 

Using lots of lube will also make the experience more enjoyable. And like any penetrative sex, condoms can help you prevent STIs. If anal sex does hurt you or your partner, stop and communicate what you do and don't like. If either partner doesn't enjoy anal sex, that's OK too. Sharing and setting boundaries can help you figure out how you prefer to orgasm. 

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Sources
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