No, it isn't just because it looks super cute.

By Samantha Lauriello
December 04, 2018

Since Chrissy Teigen welcomed her second little one into the world in May, she hasn’t shied from gracing our Instagram feeds with photos of her adorable little “bug,” as she calls him. Just yesterday, Teigen shared a photo of baby Miles looking cute as ever rocking some fun headgear. 

“My baby bug got his head shaping helmet today! Please don’t feel bad for him if you see photos. He is a happy bug and we’re just fixing his flat!” she wrote.

But what exactly does that mean, and why do some babies wear helmets? A newborn’s skull is made up of soft plates with spaces between them, according to the Mayo Clinic. As the baby grows, the plates grow, and they gradually harden and join together.

In some cases, however, the soft plates develop an uneven appearance or a flat spot, which is what Teigen was probably referring to when she referred to his "flat."

The molding of a baby’s head is generally considered a cosmetic issue and won’t cause damage to the brain. So there’s no need to worry about little Miles. Like Teigen said, he's a "happy bug.”

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If parents choose to correct the problem, a baby will typically be fitted with a custom helmet from a doctor. The head-shaping helmet is most effective between four months to a year, when the skull is still malleable and the brain is growing rapidly. Most babies wear these helmets for about three months, according to the Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library.

To prevent your kiddo from having an uneven head, make sure your child goes to sleep on her back, and alternate the direction her head faces when you place her in the crib, according to the Mayo Clinic. 

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You should also try to hold your little one more. Holding your baby while she’s awake will help relieve pressure on her head from carriers and infant seats. Also, have more tummy time—with close supervision, that is. Place your baby on her stomach on a firm surface to play.

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