Eating this diet, which is rich in fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and whole grains, can lower your risk for certain health problems. Here are a few ways you can improve your health by eating the Mediterranean Diet.

By Health.com
December 13, 2018

Out of all the trendy diets you could choose, following a Mediterranean diet is not only delicious (and may make you feel like you’re on vacay in Greece), it could boost your health. Packed with fruits and veggies, fish, whole grains, and healthful fats, the Mediterranean diet could help manage your weight, benefit your brain, improve heart health, and maybe even help you live longer. Watch the video above or scroll down to learn about the seven ways you can improve your health by eating a Mediterranean Diet.

Fights inflammation

Fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, and tuna are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which help reduce inflammation.

Strengthens skin

The omega-3s in fish help keep skin cells strong and elastic.

May help ease pain

A compound in olive oil called oleocanthal may have a similar effect to NSAIDs like ibuprofen and aspirin.

Could lower cancer risk

A Mediterranean diet may cut the risk of uterine and breast cancer.

Maintains heart health

While there has been some research to suggest that this diet supports heart health, a new study linked women who eat a Mediterranean diet to a 25% lower risk of heart disease. In the span of 12 years, researchers studied more than 25,000 women who consumed a diet high in plant-based foods, healthful fats, and olive oil (and low in meats and sugar), and found that this style of eating reduced inflammation, accounting for decreased risk of cardiovascular disease risk.

Keeps your brain sharp

Foods that are packed with antioxidants, like nuts and olive oil, may help delay the onset of mental decline.

Helps you live longer

The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of fruits, vegetables, and olive oil may help fight oxidative damage linked to aging.

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