Greasy food made the list!

Julia Naftulin
December 14, 2017
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So last night a glass of wine turned into, well, a lot more than that—and now your stomach is churning and your head feels like it's splitting into a million tiny little pieces (oy). Before you swear off alcohol forever, check out these go-to hangover cures from health experts, influencers, and a few of our editors. These are the remedies they swear by to calm the nausea, replenish electrolytes, and get back on their feet after having one (or a few!) too many.

Tea with ginger + a banana

"I'll have tea with organic honey and fresh grated ginger root, and a banana. 
Ginger is a natural nausea fighter, and this trio also provides antioxidants, which can guard against some of the inflammation and damage caused by drinking (especially to your aching brain!). As for the banana, when you get dehydrated from drinking you lose not only water, but also electrolytes, including potassium. And too little potassium can lead to cramps, fatigue, nausea, dizziness, and heart palpitations. Bananas are a good source, so they can provide some quick relief." —Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, contributing nutrition editor

RELATED: 15 Foods That Are High in Potassium

Fruit smoothie

"My go-to cure would be a smoothie made with strawberries, blueberries, OJ, and a banana—this drink will help with hydration and is chock-full of antioxidants and potassium." —Roshini Raj, MD, Health's contributing medical editor

Greasy food

"When I know I am planning to go out and play a little harder than usual, I'll take magnesium and turmeric in advance, and chug lots of coconut water to keep my electrolytes high. This combination usually helps me manage the consequences of a rowdy night on the town. But the truth is, you're going to hurt a little anyway. If you allot a "cheat day," let it be the day after the party. Mexican food, burger, and fries, maybe some pancakes—heavier, greasy food usually helps me feel a little better. Then rest! I do some twists, throw my legs up against the wall, and let it ride!" —Lauren Taus, a yoga instructor in L.A.

Berocca tablet

"My fiancé got me hooked on these effervescent vitamin supplement tablets called Berocca—they're popular in his home country of Australia—which you dissolve in a glass of water ($14, amazon.com). They're marketed as a way to get a boost of vitamins and energy, but I find they're particularly good for those mornings when you wake up feeling not-so-great after too many drinks." —Kathleen Mulpeter, senior digital editor

RELATED: 8 Alcoholic Drinks Ranked From Most Calories to Least

Ginger-infused kombucha

"Don't go for the sugary sport drinks, instead grab a kombucha—we recommend the ginger-infused [kind]. Kombucha is an alkaline-forming food, which reduces the level of acid in your stomach that comes from drinking. The slight carbonation combined with your now-balanced alkaline levels will help reduce an upset stomach. Not to mention, ginger helps soothes nausea so you'll be covered twice over!" —The Tone It Up girls

1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar

"After any night of drinking I make sure to drink a bottle of water before bed. When I wake up hungover I like to have a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in 8 oz. of water (gross going down) and it clears my stomach right out, followed by a good breakfast and fresh air." —Sarah Levey, yogi and co-founder of Y7 Studio

A fitness class (paid for in advance)

"I’m the annoying friend that forces myself to a sweaty class the day after drinking (it just might be a noon class instead of a 9 a.m.!). I usually feel like crap when I wake up if I drank more than I should have, but knowing that I committed to a class and paid for it already helps me snap out of that “I’m hungover, poor me” mindset. I get up, chug water, have a yogurt or oatmeal, put on my workout clothes, and get moving. I almost always feel better after the class. It’s mind over matter!"—Jacqueline Andriakos, senior editor

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An outdoor run

"Exercise is usually the last thing you feel like doing, but it's the only thing that really works (at least, in my opinion!). I think it's a combination of getting a good sweat, rehydrating, and fresh air and (hopefully) sunshine. I'm usually pretty grumpy about it in the moment, but afterward I'm so glad I ran." —Sarah Klein, senior digital editor