TBH, they have a point...

By Korin Miller
February 25, 2020

For most of the 24th season of The Bachelor, fans have been worried about Peter Weber's questionable taste in problematic women—but in the most recent episode, watchers were concerned about something else: Pilot Pete's head scar.

Let's rewind for a sec: Back in October—October 7, 2019, to be exact—Weber reportedly underwent emergency surgery in Costa Rica, according to PEOPLE, after he "split his head open" on multiple cocktail glasses. Weber, 27, wound up needing 22 stitches on his face.

In terms of the timeline for all of this, Weber's injury reportedly happened just one day before the women competing on this season of The Bachelor were supposed to arrive in Costa Rica. Weber reportedly had his stitches removed a week later—sometime during the week of October 13–19, according to PEOPLE—and then was spotted with a bandage on his head on October 19, per Reality Steve (a blogger who tracks and makes predictions about The Bachelor and its spinoff shows).

Less than two months after the, uh, accident, Weber's scar seemed to be healing pretty nicely: On November 27 he shared a video of himself in his pilot uniform after a quick flight, according to PEOPLE. "Feels good to be back in the sky," he wrote. Later, in December, Weber opened up to PEOPLE about his famous scar: "I had an amazing plastic surgeon," Weber said, alongside new pictures. "Thank God he was there to stay open late and sew me up. He did a really good job. And now, I got a good battle scar. It’s a memory that will always remind me of this journey!"

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All that's to say, of course, that we're not exactly seeing Weber's scar in real time. (Remember: The Bachelor began filming in Costa Rica in October—and we didn't see it until early February; and overall, the show takes about two months to film, according to Insider). But that didn't stop Twitter fans from voicing concern for Pilot Pete's head injury.

"Is it just me or does Peter's scar look more intense each week," wrote one Twitter user, while another questioned whether viewers were "looking at the beginning stages of a facial wound infection." And the favorite of the bunch: "Can someone get this boy some neosporin??? his scar is concerning me."

So how long does it take a wound to heal—and should we be worried about Peter's scar?

Everyone is different but, in general, it can take up to a year for a wound to heal completely, Gary Goldenberg, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, tells Health. That said, some deep cuts like Weber had can heal in six months—which is about three times the length of time he had to find a fiancé.

Fortunately for Weber, a facial wound like his usually heals up faster than one you’d get on another area of your body. "It takes less time for facial skin to heal since blood flow is very good on the head and neck," Goldenberg says. As far as he's concerned, Weber's scar also doesn't look infected—so Weber's fans can breathe a sigh of relief.

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Because this type of thing happens (especially when you're clumsily carrying two cocktail glasses), you can help speed up a wound's recovery time and lessen the appearance of scars by using non-prescription antibiotics and creams that contain vitamin A and vitamin E, per the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD)—just talk to a dermatologist first. Wearing a moist dressing or silicone gel (in sheet or ointment form) can also help, the AAD says. If the scar seems to have staying power, Goldenberg recommends undergoing laser treatments and platelet rich plasma treatments (PRP), which uses injections of your own platelets to heal the area.

Ultimately, Weber (and his face) seem to be doing OK. More recent photos of Weber on Instagram show a barely visible scar on his head. TBD, however, on how a Madison-sized scar on his heart may heal if she doesn't show up to next week's rose ceremony.

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