Customers are being advised to stop using the treadmills, and Peloton is offering full refunds for the machines.

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If you have one of these treadmills at home, take note: On Wednesday, Peloton announced that it would pull its Tread and Tread+ models from the market due to the risk of injury.

The voluntary recalls are part a deal struck with the US Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) in the wake of one child's death and more than 70 Tread+ treadmill-related incidents.

Peloton-Treadmill-Recall
Credit: Peloton

CPSC approved the agreement Wednesday morning, which commits the company to stop selling and distributing its treadmills and refund people who want to return their units.

The recall announcement represents a complete turnabout for the popular exercise equipment company, whose CEO, John Foley, initially balked at the CPSC's request for a recall.

"I want to be clear. Peloton made a mistake in our initial response," Foley said in a prepared statement. Peloton should have "engaged more productively" with the CPSC from the outset, he added. "For that, I apologize."

Consumers are being advised to stop using the treadmills. Peloton has agreed to refund the full purchase price to consumers.

Sales and distribution of the Tread+, which retailed for just under $4,300, have ceased, per the announcement. The recall also applies to Peloton's Tread model, a small, cheaper version offered in a limited release from November 2020 to March 2021 and priced at roughly $2,500, per Business Insider.

In April, CPSC warned consumers about the treadmill's hazards after multiple incidents involving small children and pets, including the death of a six-year-old child, per the New York Times. That incident prompted the commission to investigate all known injuries or deaths tied to the equipment.

In all, CPSC cites 72 reports of children, adults, pets, and objects being entrapped, pinned, or pulled under the rear roller of the product. That includes 29 injuries to kids who suffered second- and third-degree abrasions, broken bones, and lacerations, among other injuries.

One incident occurred when a parent was running on the treadmill, the CPSC noted in its April warning. For that reason, the commission expressed doubt at the time that simply locking the device would sufficiently protect children from harm. And considering reports of pets and objects being sucked beneath the Tread+, the commission also raised the possibility that users could lose their balance and suffer injury, too.

Acting CPSC Chairman Robert S. Adler said in a statement that the pact with Peloton culminates weeks of negotiation. "As an exercise enthusiast, I know how important treadmills can be to the people who use them. But, I also know that those who use exercise equipment want to be sure that the only pain they might feel at the end of a workout is a sore muscle from their exertion, not a serious injury from a defective product."

For a refund, consumers may contact Peloton weekdays at 844-410-0141 or weekends online at www.onepeloton.com.

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