"Every body is different, every pregnancy is different. I'm so proud of this body."

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Brittany Cartwright Cauchi and her husband, TV personality Jax Taylor, welcomed their son Cruz Michael Cauchi more than three months ago on April 12. Now Cartwright, 32, is clapping back at social media trolls after they made comments on her postpartum appearance.

According to PEOPLE, the Vanderpump Rules star took to Instagram over the weekend to tackle rude comments about her postpartum body that she received on photos of herself and her husband at the Los Angeles premiere of Midnight in the Switchgrass.

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Credit: Getty Images

Cartwright shared a photo of herself and her husband on the red carpet to her Instagram Stories, to call out the body shamers. "I keep seeing comments that I look pregnant here," she wrote. "Well guess what? I probably do—I just had a baby [three] months ago and my body is healing and I'm working hard to get back in shape."

The new mom went on to say that "every body is different" and "every pregnancy is different"—and that she's proud of what her body has done. "It gave me the best blessing I could ever imagine [and] on top of it all I felt great this night," she wrote.

Cartwright isn't the first person—and definitely won't be the last—to clap back against the postpartum "snap back," or the assumption that after giving birth a person's body should immediately go back to how it looked pre-pregnancy.

In June, How to Get Away With Murder actress Aja Naomi King shared a photo shoot of her postpartum body shortly after giving birth. "No, this is not a pregnancy before picture," she wrote in the Instagram post. "This is the After. After days of labor. After experiencing what felt like my insides being ripped apart, no lie. After experiencing the unimaginable beauty of childbirth, this is what is left behind. This gorgeous body!"

And it's not just Cartwright and King who experience this part of postpartum life—in fact, it's very common to still look slightly pregnant after giving birth, Christine Greves, MD, a board-certified ob-gyn at the Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies, previously told Health. "It takes time for the body to return to its pre-pregnancy status," she said, adding that even the uterus doesn't shrink back to its former size immediately.

Another thing to consider: Aside from the size of the uterus, it can also take a while for a person's body to lose any extra weight and fluid from the pregnancy. "The average person gains 25 to 35 pounds in pregnancy and not all of that is fluid or the baby," said Dr. Greves. "It takes time to lose that as well."

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