Here's what we know so far.

By Taylyn Washington-Harmon
October 28, 2020
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Khloe Kardashian suffered from COVID-19 earlier this year, she revealed in an ominous trailer for Thursday's episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians.

"My gut tells me she [has COVID] because she's so sick," Kim Kardashian remarked in a confessional during the trailer. "I can tell that she's now getting scared and that she's really nervous about it."

In the same trailer, Kris Jenner said that she "jumped on the phone with every doctor" who could help make sense of why Khloe was so sick. Khloe then confirms that she did contract the virus.

"It was really bad for a couple days," Khloe said on video from her bedroom, where she isolated during her illness. She opened up about her symptoms, which included vomiting, shaking, feeling "hot and then cold," and having headaches that felt worse than migraines. "My chest would burn when I cough and my throat is still not recovered, clearly," she added with gruff voice. "That shit is real."

As Health previously reported, coronavirus symptoms can look a lot like the flu, including key symptoms like fever, cough, and shortness of breath, according to the CDC.

However the reality star remained optimistic. "We'll get through this if we follow orders—we're all gonna be okay. May God bless us all."

The Kardashian Klan, Khloe included, were last seen celebrating Kim's 40th birthday on a private island, so all appears to be well.

'At the very beginning, I tested positive and it was so incredibly scary,' Kardashian explained on The Ellen Degeneres Show. "It's still scary, but especially then, when the whole world was shutting down, and we didn't have really any information, or the information we had just changed every single day.'"

The star mentioned that she quarantined in her room for 16 days without her daughter while she recovered. "I don't care about how beautiful of a place you have, being taken away from your child—because I couldn't be around my daughter—was the most heart-wrenching thing."

The information in this story is accurate as of press time. However, as the situation surrounding COVID-19 continues to evolve, it's possible that some data have changed since publication. While Health is trying to keep our stories as up-to-date as possible, we also encourage readers to stay informed on news and recommendations for their own communities by using the CDCWHO, and their local public health department as resources.

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