According to Kloots, not everyone is as lucky as President Trump.

By Taylyn Washington-Harmon
October 06, 2020
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After contracting the coronavirus and receiving care for three full days at Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, D.C., President Donald Trump announced via Twitter, "Don't be afraid of Covid," despite over 200,000 COVID-19 related deaths in the United States. Amanda Kloots, dancer and widow to the late Nick Cordero, a Broadway star who passed away from COVID-19 in July, had choice words for the President in response.

"Unfortunately not everyone is lucky enough to spend two days in the hospital," Kloots writes in a Instagram caption featuring a screenshot of Trump's tweet. "I cried next to my husband for 95 days watching what COVID did to the person I love. It IS something to be afraid of." Prior to his death, Cordero was placed in a medically-induced coma and had his right leg amputated after he lost circulation due to complications.

Kloots wasn't alone in her outrage by the President's tweets. Chris Evans of Captain America fame also had words for Trump.

"Don’t be afraid of Covid?! You’ve been under round-the-clock care by the best doctors using the best drugs," Evans tweeted. "Do you really think everyone has access to that?!" Her referred to the President's tweet as "reckless" before signing off.

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Kloots continued her thoughts in her Instagram Stories, sharing her sympathy with all of the families that have lost loved ones to COVID-19. "We are afraid, I still am," Kloots says in the heart-wrenching video. She mentions that COVID "dominated her life" for the 95 days Cordero suffered from it. "Why are you bragging? Have empathy!" Kloots says. "Side with your people." Kloots continues to outline what she wishes President Trump could have tweeted instead and refuses to apologize for her frustrations. "I'm not sorry because it's too sad and it's too real."

The current U.S. death toll is projected to reach 415,000 by January 2021, Health previously reported.

The information in this story is accurate as of press time. However, as the situation surrounding COVID-19 continues to evolve, it's possible that some data have changed since publication. While Health is trying to keep our stories as up-to-date as possible, we also encourage readers to stay informed on news and recommendations for their own communities by using the CDCWHO, and their local public health department as resources.

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