Heart Disease

Heart disease remains the leading killer in America, but even if you have a family history, heart disease and heart attacks are not inevitable. A healthy diet, regular exercise, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and lifesaving surgeries can reduce your risk of having—or dying from—a heart attack.

Featured Stories

17 Weird Things That May Affect Your Heart Disease Risk

Research suggests that your cardiovascular health could be influenced by where you live, how many kids you have, and more.

What It's Like to Have a Heart Attack in Your 20s or 30s

Heart attacks can strike at any age—and they're twice as likely to be fatal for young women than men.

I Was Thin, Fit—and Had a Heart Attack at 28

Eve Walker had no idea just how vulnerable to heart disease she was—until she looked deeper in her family history.

More Young Women Are Having Heart Attacks. This Might Be Why

The proportion of heart attack–related hospitalization rates for women ages 35 to 54 increased from 21% to 31% over the last two decades, and doctors are worried.

Heart Attack Signs Every Woman Should Know

Heart disease is now the number-one killer of women. Know the signs of heart attack, and call 9-1-1 if you or someone you know has one or more of the following symptoms.

What Is Heart Disease?

Heart disease remains the leading killer in America, but even if you have a family history, heart disease and heart attacks are not inevitable. A healthy diet, regular exercise, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and lifesaving surgeries can reduce your risk of having—or dying from—a heart attack.

More on Heart Disease


Who Was René Favaloro? What to Know About the Pioneering Doctor in Today's Google Doodle

Dr. Favaloro's contributions to the medical community changed the way cardiovascular patients are treated.