Barbara Brody

Barbara Brody

Barbara Brody is a New York-based freelance writer and editor who specializes in health and wellness. A veteran of the glossy print magazine industry, she served as Health Director at SHAPE and Health Editor at Woman's Day before going freelance. Barbara has produced several stories that garnered National Health Information Awards, as well as pieces that received accolades from the American Pain Society, the American Society of Journalists and Authors, the National Marrow Donor Program, and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Most recently, she was a finalist for an award from the Deadline Club, the NYC chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. Barbara prides herself on her ability to translate complex medical topics into stories that everyone can understand and enjoy. You'll find her work in WebMD, Prevention, AARP, Better Homes & Gardens, and many other consumer outlets (including Health, of course!). She also creates content for hospitals, medical schools, and health-related non-profits. Barbara is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ), a past president of the Newswomen’s Club of New York, and a graduate of Cornell University. She resides in Westchester with her husband, daughter, and two rescue rabbits.

Rogue cells in the bone marrow crowd out healthy cells and leave people vulnerable to infections.
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The signs are often vague and non-specific, so never assume you have this type of cancer based on symptoms alone.
An enlarged spleen can be a symptom, and chemotherapy is usually the go-to treatment.
If you have this type of blood and bone marrow cancer, it's important to start treatment right away.
The rare cancer is most commonly found during middle age.
These blood cancers sound alike but look different under the microscope.
With so many COVID-19 survivors coping with anxiety, depression, and other cognitive or emotional issues, health-care professionals are beginning to see the benefits of treating the mind in tandem with the body.
These people survived the coronavirus, only to struggle with lingering symptoms months after recovery. Here's what doctors say about this mysterious syndrome.
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Yes, you can get lung cancer even if you've never picked up the habit. These 3 women are proof.
This controversial policy diverts ambulances away from the nearest ER, and it could cost you your life in an emergency.
This dangerous abuse has been in the spotlight recently—here's how to recognize it.
Both mental health conditions can happen after you've experienced trauma, but there's a big difference between them.
What's in store for your set during this pivotal decade.
Refresh, recharge, and score more summertime me time.
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A simple trick for feeling better and getting more done.
You're not as hungry, you burn more calories, and more.