Talking to a therapist has changed them for the better—and it could help you too.

By Anthea Levi
May 14, 2018

One of the great things about social media is how people are able to share experiences and put their messy, imperfect truth out there—posting about everything from mental health issues to grief to the reality of stretch marks and cellulite.

What's also refreshing is how many influencers are opening up about the positive influence therapy has had on their lives. Going to therapy or counseling sounds like something major that only people in serious crises need. That may be true in some cases, but these five social media stars have another take on it. They've realized that seeing a therapist is a form of self care, much like a workout, massage, or other activity that lets you process your thoughts, prioritize your wellness, and help you feel better and more productive.

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Need some convincing? Hear them out by reading their recent accounts of the countless mind-body benefits of therapy.

New York City-based nutritionist Carolyn Brown, RD, recently told her 12K followers that therapy is “pretty much [her] favorite hour of the week,” as well as her number one self care practice. She also included this friendly reminder in her Instagram post: “Things don’t have to be wrong [for you] to be in therapy.” Preach.

The lifestyle blogger behind the Instagram account @seretsofsunshine shared how she finally found her way to therapy. Explaining that she initially refused to go, the blogger says she realized just how healing therapy can be—no matter what you’re going through. “Everyone needs a therapist, life is hard and sometimes it’s nice to not have to put on a brave face and a fake smile,” she wrote.

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IT’S HERE 💥Eating Disorder Recovery, Part 2, snippet below 🙌🏼 . . it was noon on a friday and i’d just finished class at UCLA law school. i was stressed: i had a paper due monday and i hadn't even started researching yet. meanwhile, my best friend's birthday party was scheduled for that evening and i was worried about how i would balance being a good friend with studying. i slid into the front seat of my car, folded down the sun shade and stared at myself in the mirror. i knew i needed to hit the books, but i was almost too stressed to get started. i needed to do something to calm down. so i folded up the mirror, turned the key in the ignition, and drove straight to Sprinkles Cupcakes in Beverly Hills, already feeling ashamed of what i knew i was about to do. ⠀ .⠀ "i'll take a dozen." i told the slim brunette behind the counter in her crisp, white apron.⠀ .⠀ "okay which flavors would you like?" was she looking at me judgmentally, or was it just my my imagination?⠀ . ⠀ "oh these are for my friend," i lied. "it's her birthday and she loves chocolate. so anything with chocolate. chocolate chips, chocolate icing. surprise me!"⠀ .⠀ but of course the cupcakes weren't for my friend. i drove straight back to my apartment and devoured each and every one, hating myself as i savored each bite of sugary sponge cake and buttery frosting. i licked the wrappers, throwing them into a messy pile in the box in front of me. i felt horrible, physically and emotionally. so i went straight to the bathroom to throw up. but unlike the gallons of Dreyers ice cream that came up so easily, the cupcakes just wouldn't come up. my stomach and heart ached. i was a failure. i’d never get this paper done. i'd never be a size 0. i’d never be good enough. and now i felt too sick to go to my friend's party, so i was a bad friend, too.⠀ .⠀ ready for more? CLICK LINK IN BIO to read the full post on the SPECIFIC STEPS i took to heal 🙌🏼 YOU CAN GET THERE TOO! #kalejunkie .⠀ website: @owenketurah pc: @melissas_healthykitchen post edits: @culturekitty

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While detailing her experience with bulimia nervosa for 15 years, Nicole Modic of the Instagram account and blog @kalejunkie credited therapy (among other things) for her recovery. “I learned a LOT about myself from all of the therapy, reading, yoga training, and sharing with my loved ones,” she wrote on her website, adding that “the important takeaway here is that once I took the power into my own hands and actively [started] looking to heal, I learned everything I needed to heal, and to heal for good.”

One thing that helps this New York City-based nutritionist get un-stuck on tough days? “Deep scary therapy,” plus a break from social media, yoga, and meditation. Get to it! But don't freak about the "scary" part. Therapy isn't supposed to terrify you; it's more about taking a closer look at your thought patterns and figuring out changes you could make to feel happier. 

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In an interview with Talkspace.com, influencer and Adidas global ambassador Chinae Alexander opened up about how therapy helped her work through a panic disorder and crippling anxiety. “I resisted medication for as long as I could, but it became pretty frightening to be fainting in public places, so to the doctor I went…pride in shambles," wrote Alexander.

"I was not the anxious, helpless girl. {CUE STIGMA } I went to therapy for years and found it to be one of my favorite parts of my week. I was on medication for six months in total. Three months in, the relationship ended and I started to heal internally. My panic never came back,” she said, adding that her doctor helped wean her off anxiety medications. “I don’t deal with panic disorder or anxiety anymore, it was about a year total that I struggled through that battle.”