The tastemaker reveals why she’s decided to open up.

By Blake Bakkila
April 05, 2018

We know Emily Schuman for her lifestyle blog Cupcakes and Cashmere, full of aspirational posts about how to recreate her wardrobe, craft tasty recipes, and live your best life. As a couple of her recent posts show, however, life isn’t always as curated as her personal brand. Schuman took to Instagram to tell others that it’s okay to not be okay.

“This whole showing-vulnerability-thing-on-social-media is new for me,” she captioned a selfie. “For years I assumed nobody wanted to see the real stuff I was struggling with, which is why I mainly stuck to the pretty, curated moments. But here's the thing. Opening up not only feels cathartic (albeit a bit intimidating)–it's also an opportunity for deeper discussions that remind us we're not alone.”

This post was shared after Schuman cried in her Instagram Story about her guilt about her daughter Sloan inheriting her anxiety. Just before her candid Story, Schuman said Sloan was crying about being instructed by new teachers. “Nothing even happened, it’s just one of those things with being a parent that sometimes you’re hyper-aware of the fact that none of this stuff comes with a manual,” she shared in the Story.

Soon after her post went up, Schuman received an overwhelming response from other moms who supported and identified with her struggles.

RELATED: 12 Signs You May Have an Anxiety Disorder

“I've already shifted my perspective,” she continued in her Instagram post. “Anxiety is not fun, but it's also a trait that goes hand-in-hand with other attributes that are some of my favorite qualities in both Sloan and myself. So here's to leaning into the uncomfortable instead of fighting it, giving my daughter the tools to best cope with her fears, and strong, waterproof mascara.”

Schuman has been embracing other not-so-perfect days recently. Last week, she delivered a reminder to her followers that she doesn’t necessarily have everything figured out. She mentioned being overwhelmed by balancing working from home and taking care of Sloan, while also admitting that her own “inner critic” had been "harsh and unforgiving."

“I hope that by acknowledging it, it’s the first step towards one day treating myself with kindness, instead of hostility, in moments of weakness,” she wrote.