Getty Images

The successful lawyer kicked the habit after meeting Clooney. Research shows that loving partners can help each other ditch bad behaviors—and stick with healthy ones.

Amelia Harnish
October 02, 2014

Amal Alamuddin is an all-around powerhouse: a successful human rights lawyer, activist, and author who speaks three languages. Oh, and she just married George Clooney, in case you hadn't heard. Good choice, George. Good choice.

But, according to this week's issue of People, Amal made a smart move of her own when the pair started dating: She quit smoking cold turkey. Alamuddin's close friend Jae Kim revealed this tidbit in a speech at the ceremony, also saying that "ever since [Amal] met George, she has been on time." (Zing!)

RELATED: 15 Ways Smoking Ruins Your Looks

Researchers have long been trying to pin down how love and marriage can affect a person's health and well-being, but of course that's nearly impossible because every relationship and every person is different. And being single has health benefits, too.

That said, many studies have linked social support from a loving spouse to an easier or more successful time changing hard-to-beat behaviors, whether it's smoking, overeating or even alcohol abuse. Research also shows that people in love tend to encourage each other to keep up healthy behaviors like flossing and exercising.

Mr. and Mrs. Clooney are still new to the whole husband-and-wife thing, but we're ecstatic to hear they're off to such a great start. Cheers to the happy, healthy couple!

RELATED: 30-Day Countdown to Quit Smoking

You May Like