You'll need a juicy grapefruit—and an adventurous partner.

August 31, 2017

Spicing up sex by bringing food into the bedroom isn't anything new. But if you've done everything you can with whipped cream and chocolate syrup, we just heard about an item that supposedly makes oral sex way hotter for a guy: grapefruit.

Grapefruit? Really. This citrus fruit had a small but memorable role in the hit flick Girls Trip, when the character played by Tiffany Haddish demonstrates the move on a banana. Apparently "grapefruiting" was popularized by a 2014 YouTube video. In it, a woman named Angel instructs viewers to cut the ends off of a grapefruit, make a hole in the middle, then put it over a guy's penis (once it's warmed up to room temperature).

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By moving it back and forth over his erection while also using your mouth, the move is supposed to make a guy feel like he's receiving oral sex and having intercourse at the same time. Spoiler: the NSFW YouTube tutorial is very explicit.

So where does Jada Pinkett Smith come into all this? During a press event for Girls Trip, which Pinkett Smith also stars in, she said that she learned about grapefruiting from her hubby, Will Smith. (Though she never said that she and Will actually engaged in the act.)

"You know that technique has been around for a while," she Pinkett Smith told an Australian TV show host. Will "was the first one to tell me about it years ago—10 years ago. And I was like, 'are you trying to tell me something?'"

We're open to all kinds of sex props, but oral sex with citrus just sounds messy and potentially painful. So in the interest of sexual health research, we reached out to Michael Eisenberg, MD, a urologist at Stanford University Medical Center in California, to find out how safe grapefruiting is.

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Just as we suspected, a grapefruit can cause problems. Dr. Eisenberg said that its acidity can lead the unpleasant side effects, like burning inside and at the opening of the urethra and pain the next time a guy pees. "The urethra isn't designed to handle grapefruit juice," he tells Health. If the burning doesn't subside after a few hours, Dr. Eisenberg says a guy who was grapefruited should see a doctor.

Despite all the buzz grapefruiting has generated thanks to the movie and Pinkett Smith, it's probably best to leave the citrus in the fridge and stick to whipped cream.