This is jaw-dropping.

Health.com
January 16, 2018

A few weeks prior to being launched into the world, most babies shift into the head-down position in the womb, ready to be delivered vaginally. But the nearly full-term baby Vanessa Fisher was carrying was in the breech position—meaning the baby was positioned with its butt or feet first.

RELATED: 5 Things That Happen to Your Vagina After You Give Birth

After finding out her baby was breech when she was 28 weeks pregnant, Fisher, a mom of one from Texas, looked into a procedure called external cephalic version—in which a doctor puts manual pressure on the uterus from the outside and turns the baby into a head-down position. "It involves actually physically turning the baby by placing hands on the woman's uterus to almost help the baby do somersaults inside the uterus," Joanne Stone, MD, director of maternal fetal medicine for the Mount Sinai Health System in New York, previously told Health.

While Fisher's doctor said a C-section could be arranged—many women whose babies are breech choose this option for a safe delivery—Fisher and her husband ultimately opted for external cephalic version. After undergoing the procedure in her 38th week, she shared a video of her experience on Facebook—and the resulting clip is bonkers.

In it, a doctor coaxes and kneads Fisher's baby bump until her little one has maneuvered into the head-down position needed for a vaginal birth.

**Warning Graphic** Dr. Cummings performs a successful External Cephalic Version [ECV] to turn our breech baby at 38 weeks. Prior to the procedure, we attempted a number of other methods to turn the baby naturally. Ultimately, our goal is to avoid a cesarean section by any means possible. SHARE this video... You have options!

Posted by Nick Vanessa Fisher on Tuesday, December 19, 2017

"Physically, there was a lot of pressure; it was unpleasant," Fisher told CafeMom of the procedure. "You might notice that I almost grabbed the doctor's hand when he was pushing on a sore spot." She added that she was impressed by how quickly the entire process was and said it ultimately quelled her anxiety about giving birth.

Fisher has yet to give birth, but with her baby in the head-down position, she's ready to welcome her child into the world via a vaginal delivery, as she'd hoped all along.