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Condition Center

Obesity

Obesity is more than just being overweight. People are considered to be obese if they have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater. (Those who are overweight have a BMI of 25 to 29.9) Obesity increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, some types of cancer, and even dementia later in life. Despite the health risks, it can be very difficult to shed extra pounds, and keep them off.

Obesity News

  • Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal

    By Kathleen DohenyHealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The hot flashes and night sweats of menopause don’t play out the same for all women, new research shows. Almost 80 percent of women do get hot flashes, night sweats or both during menopause, the researchers found. But the timing of these symptoms and how long [...][...]

  • New Drug Seems to Help People With Rare Disease That Causes Constant Hunger

    An experimental drug spurred substantial weight loss in people with a rare genetic disorder that causes severe obesity because patients feel perpetually hungry.

  • New Drug May Treat Rare Obesity Disorder Causing Constant Hunger

    By Amy NortonHealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) — An experimental drug spurred substantial weight loss in people with a rare genetic disorder that causes severe obesity because patients feel perpetually hungry. The study included only two patients with the disorder, known as proopiomelanocortin deficiency. But those two patients account for two-thirds of all known dult [...]

  • Cutting Down on Sweets Can Help Kids’ Hearts

    TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Cutting sugar — not calories — is the key to reducing the risk of heart disease among obese children, a new study suggests. Curbing the kids’ sugar intake improved their triglyceride levels (a type of blood fat, or “lipid”) as well as levels of a protein associated with heart [...][...]

  • College Linemen Larger Than Ever, Study Finds

    MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Offensive linemen who play college football — even at small Division III schools — are getting bigger than ever, a new study shows. Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston found these players were 38 percent heavier than their counterparts were in 1956. Meanwhile, the average male’s [...][...]