These images are shocking—but her recovery is inspiring.

Blake Bakkila
February 05, 2018

Two years ago, during a desperate battle with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa, 22-year-old Connie Inglis was admitted to the hospital—weighing about as much as an average 5-year-old. 

“I didn’t really care about living, dying, whatever,” she told the BBC in an interview airing Monday. “I didn’t mind. I just wanted to lose all the weight. Everything. Because it had gotten to the point where being in hospital wasn’t good enough. The only thing that would’ve been good enough is if my heart stopped. That’s the only thing that would have satisfied my anorexia.”

Connie's battle with Anorexia

Connie is proud of her body after anorexia, and social media is helping her recovery. via BBC Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire See more on BBC One at 7:30pm on Monday.

Posted by BBC Look North (Yorkshire) on Sunday, February 4, 2018

Im finally seeing the light!!!! TW eating disorders 💙 💙 Firstly I want to say this is not a look how skinny I was or look how well I've done post. This is to hopefully show you that no matter how lost you are in your own head, it is possible to escape! It is possible to find happiness again!!! 💙 💙 Secondly you do not have to be this shape, size colour or gender for your struggles to matter! You are always deserving of help if you are struggling!!! 💙 💙 Last year I was sectioned under the mental health act. I was so ill I was doing everything I could think of to not take in ANYTHING. I had given up. My eating disorder had taken over and I wanted to die. So I was sectioned and forced to get better. I was put on an ng tube. I was forced to watch as the scale went up every week and I could do nothing about it. (Not that I didn't try) Last year I was a mess. 💙 💙 But the people I loved stayed by me. My best friends and my boyfriend came to see me all the time and my parents where there every day. They where there to remind me to try. So I did. For the first time in my life I realised that I loved these people more than my ed. so I fought, I fought like hell!!! 💙 💙 I'm not telling you this for sympathy or to diminish anyone's struggles, (everyone's struggle is valid!!! No matter how long it takes!!) I’ve been in this for 10 years now and I still struggle but I can see the light now. I know that the fight is worth it. I know that the scales don’t mean a thing. And I want you to know that it is possible!!!!! It is possible to get out of the darkness! No not all my problems have gone away. Yes I still have the thoughts. But I am strong enough now to resist! Keep going! You can get through this hell and I will be with you every step of the way!!! We can do this together!!!! 💙💛💜 (No questions about weight please!!) #positivebeatsperfect

A post shared by Connie💜🦄Positive.beats.perfect (@my_life_without_ana) on

Now, after three hospitalizations in nine years and living with anorexia for more than a decade, the U.K. resident is sharing her recovery, documenting how she went from being told she had just weeks to live to learning to love herself and her body.

“When I was 13 I really struggled talking about my problems, to the point where I didn’t say anything for six months because I didn’t want to talk about what was going on,” she said in the BBC interview. “The only thing I said was, ‘I’m fine.’“

RELATED: Subtle Signs of Eating Disorders

She’s speaking up now, with before-and-after transformations, unfiltered pictures of herself, and captions expressing her feelings about mental illness and self-love. “Not everyone has to look like a Victoria’s Secret model all the time,” said Inglis, who frequently uses the hashtag #positivebeatsperfect.