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Body image has been a hot topic of conversation lately. Last week began with critiques of whether a size 10 Calvin Klein model should be considered “plus-size”; and now, the Internet is discussing the “thin-shaming” of Taylor Swift.

Julie Mazziotta
November 17, 2014

Body image has been a hot topic of conversation lately. Last week began with critiques of whether a size 10 Calvin Klein model should be considered “plus-size”; and now, the Internet is discussing the “thin-shaming” of Taylor Swift.

On Wednesday, DJ and producer Diplo tweeted “Someone should make a kickstarter to get taylor swift a booty.” Within an hour, one of his followers had set up a Fundly page, which has raised $95 of its $3,500 goal. No word what that money would actually buy. Swift's friend and fellow musician Lorde quickly stepped in to defend her by tweeting a dig about Diplo's male anatomy.

This certainly isn’t the first time Swift’s body has been criticized, with articles guessing her BMI and questioning whether she’s too thin. Never mind that we don’t actually know her eating habits, workout routine, or health history—and even if we did, negative comments about her physique are still bullying.

RELATED: 9 Ways to Silence Your Inner Critic

Body shaming isn't limited to the criticism of people who are overweight, as any svelte person who's been told to eat a sandwich knows. Placing a body-related label on someone—whether it’s fat, skinny, plus-sized, or lacking "booty"—is demeaning.

And some even object to the term "real women," as it implies that anyone whose figure doesn’t look like the majority isn’t “real.”

Supermodel Coco Rocha, who has taken issue with labeling models as “plus-size,” was asked about her take on the Calvin Klein controversy at an event on Thursday. Rocha told the Huffington Post why she can't stand when people talk about the bodies of "real women":

"Even when they say 'real women.' I hate that too. We're all real. When someone tells me that I'm not real, I say to them, 'Well, what about me isn't real?' I have not changed my figure. This is who I am. My mom [has this body], this is genetics. So for anyone to be called plus-size, petite or 'not real,' it just frustrates me…" 

Perhaps Rocha could have a talk with Diplo, and end this unnecessary Twitter battle for everyone.

RELATED: 7 Strategies to Love the Way You Look

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