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Human Papillomavirus

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is not one virus, but a family of them. (There are more than 100 types.) HPV can be sexually transmitted, and it can cause genital warts and cervical cancer. HPV infections are very common—half of sexually active people in the U.S. get HPV—but relatively few people have lasting health effects. HPV usually goes away on its own without treatment, although vaccines can protect against the virus.

HPV News

  • Cancer Experts Endorse CDC’s HPV Vaccine Guidelines

    TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The American Cancer Society has endorsed the U.S. government’s HPV vaccination recommendations, which include immunizing all preteens against the sexually transmitted human papilloma virus. In a new report, the cancer society says 11- and 12-year-old girls as well as boys should be vaccinated to guard against cancers associated with [...][...]

  • HPV-Linked Cancers Still Climbing in U.S.

    Cancers linked to the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) keep rising in the United States, even though most cases are preventable.

  • HPV-Linked Cancers Still Climbing in U.S.

    THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Cancers linked to the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) keep rising in the United States, even though most cases are preventable, health officials reported Thursday. Cervical cancer, and mouth and throat cancers in men, accounted for most of the nearly 39,000 HPV-associated cancers diagnosed annually from 2008 to 2012, [...][...]

  • Study Hints at HPV Vaccine’s Cancer Prevention Promise

    MONDAY, July 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine appears to prevent abnormalities that can lead to cervical cancer, a new study shows. Canadian researchers found that young women who received the vaccine through a school-based program were less likely to have such abnormalities when screened for cervical cancer than those who did [...][...]

  • Vaccine Has Cut HPV Infection Rate in Teen Girls by Two-Thirds: Study

    By Steven ReinbergHealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Ten years of vaccinating against human papillomavirus (HPV) has cut infections from this cancer-causing virus by 64 percent among teen girls, U.S. health officials report. “We are continuing to see decreases in the HPV types that are targeted by the vaccine,” said lead researcher Dr. Lauri [...][...]