What the Yuck?!

Is My Yeast Infection Related to What I'm Eating?

Juliette Borda


Need help with excessive burping, yeast infections, or acne? Our experts answer your questions

Q:Every time I eat, I seem to turn into a burping machine. Whats going on?

A: Eating too fast can lead to burping because you swallow excess air as you chow down. To ease the problem, schedule more time for meals and eat at a more leisurely pace, concentrating on chewing slowly.

You will cut down on the amount of gas in your stomach and may even eat less (youll notice that youre getting full and stop). Other burp inducers to avoid: talking while you chew, drinking soda, chewing gum, or using a straw.

If the burping persists even after youve slowed down and changed your habits, if you develop a burning sensation in your chest and throat, or if you notice that certain foods cause pain in your stomach, you may have an ulcer or acid reflux.

See your doctor, who will likely perform a physical examination, including blood tests. If you have an ulcer or have signs of acid reflux, nonprescription antacids, acid blockers like Zantac, or proton-pump inhibitors like Prilosec or Nexium can help.

Q:Ive developed acne on my back. Why does it crop up there and how do I get rid of it?

A: The likely trigger is sweat, but its not that simple. Acne occurs when excess oil production and the accumulation of dead skin cells and bacteria clog your pores. Perspiration thats left to dry on your back after exercising can worsen this pattern, and clothes that are too tight or a backpack that rubs against your back may do the same.

To avoid “bacne,” wear loose, breathable (preferably cotton) tops; always shower right after exercising or working up a sweat; and use a sponge or loofah attached to a long handle to regularly wash the hard-to-reach parts of your back.

To get rid of the zits, try topical creams or cleansers, which usually work for mild cases. Use a cleanser with salicylic acid or retinol, such as Avon Clearskin Professional Deep Pore Cleansing Scrub ($12; ).

An everyday body wash like Neutrogena Body Clear ($6.99) may help, too. If these lifestyle and cleansing moves dont help, check with your dermatologist. Sometimes hormone fluctuations (which can occur with your period, pregnancy, or menopause) are to blame, or it could be a bacterial infection that requires antibiotics.