Last updated: May 12, 2009
Summer vacation is all about taking a break from the norm. Trouble is—whether you're relaxing on the beach, catching up with relatives, or exploring new places—dropping your workout can quickly become the routine.


It doesn't have to be that way. We've got 16 fresh strategies to help you keep moving when you're on the go, no matter where you're headed.

Destination: Parents' or in-laws'
1. Spend quality time with the folks while taking a walk through the neighborhood.

2. Take advantage of the track or trails at the local high school.

3. Plan a morning stroll to an area coffee shop or farmers' market. (To find a market near you, visit this USDA Web site.)

4. Pitch in—and earn some brownie points—around the house by doing aerobic chores like gardening, mowing, and window-washing.


Destination: Beach
1. Walk or run on the wet, packed sand by the water's edge. You'll burn extra calories without that going-nowhere feeling that comes with trying to move through dry, deep sand.

2. Rent equipment from local shops for activities like snorkeling, kayaking, and sailing. (Many offer lessons, too.)

3. Pack toys (or buy them at the beach) like inflatable balls and Frisbees, then play a seaside game or two with your travel buddies.

4. Ditch your car and walk or bike back and forth to the beach.


Destination: City
1. Compete in a pedometer contest with your travel companion. Whoever racks up the most steps each day gets treated to dinner or a manicure.

2. Visit yogafinder.com to find a class near the place you'll be staying.

3. Take a guided walking tour and get to know the city better while staying in shape.

4. For a motivating challenge, plan your trip to coincide with a 5K walk or run. (Check out Active.com to find one.)

Destination: Road trip
1. Scout hotels or motels ahead of time for great pools. Or log on to Swimmers Guide to find a pool anywhere in the world that's fit for lapping.

2. Visit Swimmingholes.org before you hit the road to find refreshing gems along your route.

3. Bring or rent a bicycle and explore local bike trails. (Find them at Traillink.com.)

4. Plan hikes along the way. To find a trail, log on to this National Park Service Web site or Americanhiking.org.