Dietitians may seem like nutrition encyclopedias, but that's usually just because we've gotten really good at knowing where to look for the answers to just about every nutrition question. We all have our favorite web sites, for example, that we check frequently for the latest nutrition research, as well as healthy recipes developed by top chefs.

May 21, 2009


By Julie Upton, RD
Dietitians may seem like nutrition encyclopedias, but that's usually just because we've gotten really good at knowing where to look for the answers to just about every nutrition question. We all have our favorite websites, for example, that we check frequently for the latest nutrition research, as well as healthy recipes developed by top chefs. And, of course, we always appreciate sites that make nutrition facts easy to access—and easy for everyone to understand.

Some of my favorites are the sites of specific boards or trade associations that represent farmers and processors of specific food products. Here are some of my go-to picks, organized by food group.

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Fruits and vegetables
From picking a papaya to preparing or storing star fruit (or any other fruit), one of the best sites is fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org, the Produce for Better Health's online resource. If you want to know how to, say, grill a nectarine or avocado, check out eatcaliforniafruit.com.

Whole grains
Do you need to know how many grams of whole grains are in a cup of whole-wheat pasta or brown rice? Just check out wholegrainscouncil.org.

Nuts and plant-based protein
I'm sometimes curious to see how, say, a macadamia stacks up nutritionally against an almond or pistachio. To find out, I'll go to pistachiohealth.com or almondsarein.com. Or if I'm in the mood to make a tofu flan or ranch dressing, I'll visit soyfoods.org to find novel ways to turn tofu and other soy-based products into great treats.

Dairy products and probiotics
There are two sites I love that provide everything you need to know about milk-based products: nationaldairycouncil.org and whymilk.com. If you want to know how many billions of live beneficial bacteria are required for a product to be labeled as a probiotic, log on to usprobiotics.org.

Lean protein
When it comes to talking turkey, there's nothing better than eatturkey.com for ideas on how to make this economical lean protein more than just a Thanksgiving mainstay. For the non-terrestrial protein options, check out aboutseafood.com.

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