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You may get more nutritional bang for your buck if you add eggs.

Beth Lipton
April 02, 2015

We’ve been telling you for a while now to get your vegetables at breakfast. Turns out, if those vegetables are raw and you eat them with cooked eggs, you may get the most nutrition bang for your buck.

In a new study, researchers at Purdue University found that eating cooked whole eggs with raw vegetables increased  absorption of carotenoid, an antioxidant, up to nine times. Higher consumption of carotenoids may help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers, as well as boosting eye health.

This is well-timed news, since the recent update of recommendations by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee suggested removing the focus on dietary cholesterol, so whole eggs would no longer be a problem.

The researchers gave 16 college-age men three varieties of a dish: one was a salad with no eggs, one was a salad with 1 ½ scrambled eggs, and the third was a salad with 3 scrambled eggs. The subjects who ate the most eggs showed between and three- and ninefold increase in carotenoid absorption, Science Daily reports. The study is to be presented at the 2015 Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology meeting.

So how can you take advantage of this delicious discovery? Next time you’re at a bistro, order a salade Lyonnaise. This classic French dish combines bitter greens (usually frisee) with eggs, bacon and a warm vinaigrette. Or, try one of these simple recipes:

Try this recipe: Layered Cobb Salad

Try this recipe: Bibimbop (Rice and Vegetable Medley) 

Try this recipe: Egg and Rice Salad to Go

Try this recipe: Roasted Asparagus With Egg and Tomato

Try this recipe: Herb Garden Salad

Try this recipe: Spinach Salad with Bacon and Eggs

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