For fitness inspiration, look no further than the fearless women in this clip.

Rozalynn S. Frazier
November 03, 2017

There is nothing more inspiring than a badass female athlete. And Adidas’ latest campaign is chockfull of them.

Titled Fearless AF, the just-released one-minute spot dispels tired stereotypes about women in sports, including the idea that female runners are not tough, fast, strong, determined, or competitive enough. As a male announcer’s voice repeatedly lists all the ways women who compete are supposedly subpar, the screen flashes images of female athletes doing their thing and just standing around looking cool and confident.

With its heartbeat-like background drumming, the ad feels like a rallying cry, asking viewers to dig deep and find their inner champion—and be fearless.

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“Fearless AF means feeling the fear and doing it anyway,” Robin Arzon, a lawyer-turned-ultramarathoner who is featured in the ad, tells Health. It's about "leaning into the knowledge that you’ve survived 100% of your worst days and a community of women is cheering you on,” she adds.

Along with Arzon, the video features five other Adidas athletes and ambassadors—supermodel Karlie Kloss; Katherine Switzer, the first woman to officially run the Boston marathon; Mary Keitany, three-time winner and defending New York City Marathon women’s champion; founder of Girls Run NYC Jessie Zapo; and Jen Rhines, a three-time Olympian. Each represents a defining character trait: boss, fearless, determined, bold, creative, and fierce.

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These six women are running this year’s TSC New York City Marathon on Sunday. (Talk about #squadgoals!) The commercial also pays homage to OG marathoner Switzer, with images of her being attacked mid-race in 1967 by the Boston Marathon race director at the time, as well as shots of race bibs bearing her number falling into the frame.

We dare you to watch this 60 seconds of awesomeness and not be inspired to lace up those kicks and hit the pavement for at least a mile or two.