courtesy of Stella McCartney

There's nothing like a bra that's both comfortable and beautiful, and we can think of no group of women who deserve—no, need—a bra that meets those criteria more than women recovering from breast cancer surgery.

Julie Mazziotta
September 28, 2015

There's nothing like a bra that's both comfortable and beautiful, and we can think of no group of women who deserveno, needa bra that meets those criteria more than women recovering from breast cancer surgery.

Enter Stella McCartney's latest creation, a post-mastectomy compression bra created in honor of the designer's late mother Linda Louise McCartney, who died of breast cancer in 1998.

The soft, cotton bra comes in a light rose color with a pretty lace overlay, and includes a front zipper to make dressing easier. The wide underband and high sides add compression and much-needed support during the healing process.

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“We wanted women to know that you can still be feminine, have your sensuality, have all of the things that are attached to being a woman and that part of your body can still feel beautiful on the outside, as well as the inside,” McCartney said of the design in a statement provided to People StyleWatch.

She continued, “We wanted to bring something feminine and beautiful into a bra that is taboo. There are so many different emotions attached to the tragic realities of having had a double mastectomy, many cultures are unaccepting and terrible things happen to women both physically and emotionally. And we just wanted to make something that allows women undergoing this to have something to be proud of, something with no shame attached.”

The bra, named the Louise Listening Bra, retails for $125, with all proceeds going to the Hello Beautiful Foundation, a breast cancer awareness and support charity in the United Kingdom.

Along with the Louise Listening Bra, McCartney also announced a line of bright pink lingerie, called the Alina Playing set, with a percentage of the proceeds from that line going to the Linda McCartney Centre in the U.K., and the National Breast Cancer Foundations of the United States and Australia.

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McCartney hopes that the Alina line, along with the influence of campaign model Cara Delevingne, will push more young women to think about screening and prevention.

"Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women all over the world," she said in an interview on her web site. "While most people are aware of the terrible disease, many forget to take the steps to make the effort to detect it at its early stages, so I designed a set to remind women to consider their health and visit their doctor regularly. [Cara] has that confidence that we want to bring to a new generation of young women and also inspire all generations of women to be aware of breast cancer and to be aware that preventing it is the most positive approach.”

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