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Breast Cancer

Few things are as terrifying as thinking you might have breast cancer, but thanks to advances in testing and treatment, breast cancer is less deadly than ever. The good news is that breast cancer rates are dropping, and treatment is less toxic and disfiguring than it once was.

Breast Cancer News

  • IVF Won’t Raise Risk for Breast Cancer

    TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Women who undergo in vitro fertilization (IVF) to boost their odds of having a baby aren’t at increased risk of breast cancer, according to Dutch researchers. Their study of more than 25,000 women found no “significant increase in the long-term risk of breast cancer among women treated with these [...][...]

  • Even High-Fat Mediterranean Diet Good for You: Review

    By Kathleen DohenyHealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Even a high-fat Mediterranean diet may protect against breast cancer, diabetes and heart disease, a new review finds. “If you adhere to a Mediterranean diet, you will probably have fewer heart attacks and strokes, and will be less likely to develop breast cancer and less likely [...][...]

  • Definition of ‘Dense’ Breasts Can Vary Depending on the Doctor

    A woman’s odds of being told she has “dense” breasts may depend on which radiologist reads her mammogram, a new study finds.

  • Wide Variation Seen in ‘Dense’ Breast Diagnoses

    By Amy NortonHealthDay Reporter MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) — A woman’s odds of being told she has “dense” breasts may depend on which radiologist reads her mammogram, a new study finds. The study, which involved centers in four U.S. states, found that radiologists varied widely in how often they defined mammography patients’ breasts as dense. [...][...]

  • Weight Loss Might Reduce Cancer Risk: Study

    By Steven ReinbergHealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Overweight and obese women who lose weight may lower their odds of developing cancer as their levels of cancer-linked proteins drop, a new study suggests. These proteins — VEGF, PAI-1 and PEDF — promote the growth of blood vessels, a process that is necessary to help [...][...]